Green Tea Fat Burner Review

Green Tea Fat Burner claims to help unwanted pounds melt away; it allegedly kick-starts your fat-burning potential, while providing you optimal antioxidant protection with the effects of concentrated green tea.  

You can find Green Tea Fat Burner at Wal-Mart, Walgreens, and online as well. One 90-gelcap bottle costs around $25.00. The brand also offers another similar product called the Green Tea Triple Fat Burner, which contains three different tea extracts: white tea, black tea, and green tea. It also comes in the form of gel capsules and costs around $15.00 for 30 capsules. 

Applied Nutrition produces Green Tea Fat Burner, which has been on the market since 1993. The company does not have a Better Business Bureau profile. Company Contact Information: Applied Nutrition, 5310 Beethoven Street, Los Angeles, CA 90066. Customer Service Toll Free: 1-800-297-3273.  

Green Tea Fat Burner Claims 

Green Tea Fat Burner increases your calorie burning ability in fast-acting Liquid Soft-Gels. This product has been formulated to provide a highly concentrated form of green tea extract combined with caffeine that, while not literally “melting” fat off the body, has been shown to: 

  •  Increase calorie burning (thermogenesis)
  • Kick-start your fat burning ability (fat oxidation)
  • Supply powerful antioxidant protection 

When used in conjunction with a reduced calorie diet and exercise, this product can help you achieve your weight loss goals. [1] 

They tout the active ingredients: 

Green Tea Extract– Traditionally used in China for thousands of years, green tea delivers a wide range of health-promoting nutrients and antioxidants. Green Tea Fat Burner delivers a standardized extract of green tea with superior levels of EGCG for optimum results. 

GCG – EGCG is the most powerful and most abundant antioxidant found in green tea. A body of research suggests that EGCG is responsible for the majority of health benefits that are attributed to green tea consumption. When combined with caffeine, EGCG has been scientifically researched for weight management support. This product contains a full 400 mg of EGCG per maximum daily dose.  

Vitality Boost – This blend of adaptogenic botanicals contributes nutrients that can assist your weight loss efforts and help to promote overall well-being 

Antioxidant Boost – This combination of nutrient-dense “super fruits” contributes a range of antioxidant activity that protects against cell-damaging free radicals. [1] 

Along with the standard “not FDA-evaluated statements” disclaimer, there’s an additional warning in accordance with California Prop 65:  

California Residents Proposition 65 WARNING: (State of California Prop 65) This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. [1]  

I will look into that ingredient in the section below. Anytime you see Prop 65, always be alert, especially if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. 

They warn to not take this supplement at night because it’s loaded with caffeine, which may keep you awake if you are sensitive at all. The recommended dosage is 2 gelcaps in the morning, and then two in the afternoon if you need them.  

Pregnant and nursing moms are urged not to take this supplement at all, as the elevated levels of caffeine could harm your child.  

Ingredients in Green Tea Fat Burner 

Per 2 Liquid Soft-Gels: 

Green Tea Extract (50% EGCG) (leaf), 400 mg 

Caffeine, 160 mg 

Antioxidant Boost, 100 mg: Bilberry powder (fruit), Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) extract (4:1) (fruit), European Elder (Elderberry) powder (fruit), Grape Skin extract (5:1) (fruit), Pomegranate powder (fruit), Holy Basil Extract 

Vitality Boost, 86 mg: Eleuthero powder (0.8% eleutherosides) (root), Holy Basil (2% ursolic acid) (herb), Maté (Yerba Maté) powder (leaf), Schisandra (Schisandra chinensis) powder (fruit), and Asian Ginseng extract (80% ginsenosides) (root). [1] 

Yerba Mate and Caffeine both have concerns with pregnant or nursing women—these are likely the reason for the Prop 65 warning, though I couldn’t find either of them specifically on the list. [2] [3] [4] 

The Science (or Lack Thereof) Behind Green Tea Fat Burner 

Green Tea has been around the health world for a long time. Unlike black teas (English Breakfast, Earl Grey, etc.), green tea leaves aren’t fermented; instead, green tea is prepared by steaming and pan-frying the same Camellia sinesis leaves and then drying them. When steeped, they produce a lighter-flavored tea, high in antioxidants, that has a lot of benefits. Three 8-ounce cups each day is all you need, because like the black teas there is still a fair amount of caffeine in green tea. 

But that’s the actual tea. A lot of supplements today use a concentrated variation: Green Tea Extract. It contains the same types of beneficial antioxidants, but in extremely high amounts. And therein lies concern, particularly with one called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, or ECGC. 

“Dietary supplements containing green tea extract are supposed to be good for you. Unfortunately, a growing number of studies suggest that high doses of EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate) can have toxic side effects, including liver damage.” [5]  

Currently there’s enough concern that at least one law firm is actively searching for clients who’ve suffered liver damage as a result of taking green tea extract supplements. [5] 

This may be another ingredient worthy of Prop 65 warning, but again, it wasn’t on the list in any name variation I could find. [2] 

My own opinion is that extracts tend to fall under the category of “too much of a good thing.” Multiple studies done around the world seem to be reaching the same conclusion: overconsumption of Green Tea Extract can cause inflammation of the liver, and in some cases cause acute hepatitis.  

One study, published in the August 2014 Journal of Ethnopharmacology, outlined the case study of a 63-year-old woman being treated for cancer with green tea capsules on the recommendation of a support group. She developed acute hepatitis, which couldn’t be attributed to any cause other than the high concentration of EGCG in her system. The study concludes: 

The present case highlights the fact that such concentrated herbal extracts from green tea may not be free of adverse effects under certain circumstances. There is still a lack of a uniform European Union-wide surveillance system for adverse drug reactions of herbal products. Therefore this case underlines the importance of public awareness in the potential risks in use of herbal products. [6] 

This is not saying green tea, or even green tea extract, is bad for you; rather, too much green tea extract can be bad for you. Very bad. But green tea can also be very good for you.  

According to The Diet Supplement, weight loss seen through the consumption of green tea comes in two methods:  

When added to a person’s weight loss program as a beverage, its action in the body boosts the metabolism and burns fatand pounds are shed. …Weight loss is enhanced when dieters replace sodas and other high-calorie drinks with green tea by eliminating an unhealthy source of fat and carbohydrates[7] 

With talk of a sped-up metabolism, it can work as a thermogenic, but not in the way you might have imagined. According to an article in the February 2000 International Journal of Obesity 

The thermogenic effect of tea is generally attributed to its caffeine content. We report here that a green tea extract stimulates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis to an extent which is much greater than can be attributed to its caffeine content per se, and that its thermogenic properties could reside primarily in an interaction between its high content in catechin-polyphenols and caffeine with sympathetically released noradrenaline (NA). [8] (emphasis added) 

Green Tea Fat Burner claims that high levels of green tea extract have an impact on weight management may be correct in the sense that you have more energy so you may move around more. The more you move around, the more calories you burn. But EGCG isn’t going to burn fat just by you consuming it. According to Health.com 

“Any effect you see from green tea is probably due to the caffeine,” says Tod Cooperman, MD, president of the independent testing company ConsumerLab.com, although a compound called EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate) may also be at work. “A stimulant will cause you to burn calories if it causes you to move more,” Dr. Cooperman explains. “And green tea contains a fair amount of caffeine.” [9]  

Side effects from green tea extract supplements can range from a racing heart, headaches, nausea, to potential liver damage if you overdo it.  

Word On The Street About Green Tea Fat Burner  

There were a variety of sources for Green Tea Fat Burner reviews, because it’s sold in many different places. Common side effects noted overall were headaches, crashes, and jitters. This is most likely due to the high levels of caffeine you are consuming from each pill.  

The Walgreens.com site only had 5 reviews—2 loving it and 3 hating it, with no middle ground at all. The Amazon.com reviews had more of a spectrum, averaging out to 3.7 of 5 stars.  

But even some 4-star reviews weren’t exactly in the “love” column. “Jenna W.” (Amazon, 2014, 4 stars): 

When I first started using this product, I was in love. It worked so well and I had no negative side effects. It’s easy to take when there’s no time for coffee. I’ve been taking it almost every day for 3 months and it has lost its effectiveness. I now have to take four pills at once for the same result. I would recommend this to someone who only needs healthy energy on a few rare occasions. It’s good and good for you, but if you work as much as I do you might as well stick to coffee. [10]  

“Joshua M Kidd” (Amazon, 2014, 3 stars):  

Got this to add into my fat burn stack. For a cheap caffeine and antioxidant supplement it does the job. However, I'm sure I could get the same results with a cup or two of actual green tea. If you're a fan of taking pills, by all means give it a shot. You'll feel the extra jitter from the caffeine, but, nothing special about this product as a fat burner. [11] 

“Jahlisha L.” (Amazon, 2017, 1 star) said,  

Causes terrible headaches. I was very excited about my new journey of weight loss because I was going to start taking these. Took them for 3 days and the headaches I got while taking them were unbearable! They hurt extremely bad and I just couldn’t take it. Had to stop after day 3. That was over a month ago and I haven’t had a headache since! [12] 

“sajones2888” (Walgreens, 2016, 1 star) said,  

Don’t waste your money. I am trying to lose weight and get a little more energy and this helped with neither. I was eating better and working out more prior to starting this and took this for several weeks and saw no difference in my weight and no difference in my energy. After doing a little more research on green tea tablets I found that this particular one is only equivalent to less than 1 cup of coffee and not enough of anything to help with weight loss. [13]  

The Bottom Line: Is Green Tea Fat Burner Worth A Try? 

Risky. Many people think “tea” and then they think “fat loss,” but there is more to it. This type of burner when coupled with healthy diet and nutrition might give you more energy, but it’s hardly the “fat melter” it claims to be. 

At its core, this is a caffeine pill with some possible benefits, but the concerns about too much ECGC leave me cautious. And you should be cautious about caffeine anyway, especially in hidden sources like Yerba Mate.  This might be an okay quick replacement for the occasional missed cup of coffee, but you’re better off steeping the tea itself.

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