Nutrim Review

Nutrim is a nutritional drink containing Oat Beta Glucans, developed by the US Department of Agriculture, and it has been said to help lower cholesterol and aid in better digestion.

FutureCeuticals, Inc., produces Nutrim. Founded in 1999, they are headquartered in Momence, Illinois, with additional facilities in Wisconsin, California, and Europe. Their phone contact information is 800-862-0438. In 2007, they launched Oathealth.com specifically for direct sale of Nutrim to the public. Currently they have an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau with zero complaints filed. [1] [2]

One 30-serving canister of Nutrim costs $25.00 plus shipping on the FutureCeuticalsDirect website. They also sell a 120-serving canister for $75 (both have discounts for multiple-canister purchases), and a Success Kit—two 30-serving canisters plus a guidebook for lowering cholesterol—for $50. Amazon.com sells the Success Kit for $60, a four-canister option (120 servings) for $80, and an eight-canister option (240-servings) for $140. [3] [4]

Nutrim Claims

“Unleash the Power of Oats.” [5]

“Help Yourself to Lower Cholesterol” [6]

“Oats and oat beta glucans have been shown to lower cholesterol naturally in over 50 years of research. … Nutrim® is rich in beta glucans and its all natural patented processing qualifies it for the FDA heart health claim. Nutrim® attacks cholesterol in multiple ways, giving your body a fighting chance to lower cholesterol naturally.” [5]

“Nutrim® was developed by a USDA Agricultural Research Service Hall of Fame scientist, Dr. George Inglett to make it easier to get the benefits of oats to help fight cholesterol. His patented process optimizes Nutrim®’s viscosity, …The specialized processing also creates a powder that is easy to mix and creates a luscious creamy texture for foods and beverages.” [5]

“Nutrim®’s patented process liberates the oat ß-glucans, a food component recognized by the FDA to help lower cholesterol*. This component has been carefully analyzed and heavily studied for decades.

*Soluble fiber from foods such as Nutrim®, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce risk of heart disease because of its cholesterol lowering effects. One serving of Nutrim® provides 750mg of the oat ß-glucan fiber necessary per day to have this effect.[7]

Finally, regarding their return policy on Nutrim, they say “Product(s) CAN be opened and used, and still be eligible for return and/or the 90 day money back guarantee. In the event that a package is damaged during the shipping process, please call (800) 862-0438.” [8]

Nutrim Ingredients [9]

The ingredient list for this product is rather short: Nutrim Oat Bran with 10% B-Glucans.

Essentially, it’s powdered oat bran that blends smoothly into all kinds of liquids. It is rich in fiber, and can be mixed with both food and drink with the same effect in the body.

Nutrim is non-GMO and gluten-free. [10]

The Science Behind Nutrim

Oats have been a big deal for a long time, especially when it comes to heart health. Cheerios and Quaker Oatmeal used to run commercials about their cereals being heart-healthy (and they have the FDA’s backing on that; plain Cheerios and Quaker Oatmeal do meet the FDA requirement for “Oat heart health”). Nutrim meets the same criteria, but you don’t have to pour it in a bowl with milk. Let’s look at the clinical evidence for oats as beneficial to cholesterol maintenance, and in turn heart health.

The FDA first approved food labels carrying a definitive link between eating oatmeal and lowering cholesterol in 1997. Since then, the evidence has just gotten stronger; in fact, a study by Dr. James W. Anderson at the University of Kentucky, published in the January/February 2008 American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine showed that link to be even stronger than first thought. [11]

WebMD has a great concise description of how the whole process works:

Oatmeal is full of soluble fiber, which we know lowers LDL levels. Experts aren’t exactly sure how, but they have some ideas. When you digest fiber, it becomes gooey. Researchers think that when it’s in your intestines, it sticks to cholesterol and stops it from being absorbed. So instead of getting that cholesterol into your system—and your arteries—you simply get rid of it as waste. [12]

Also from WebMD:

Some studies have shown that oats, when combined with other cholesterol-lowering foods, can have a big effect on cholesterol levels. In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers tested cholesterol-lowering drugs against cholesterol-lowering foods in a group of thirty-four adults with high cholesterol. Oat products were among the chosen foods. The results were striking. The diet lowered cholesterol levels about as well as cholesterol drugs. [12]

How about evidence for Nutrim specifically? We go to a study published in the American Journal of Therapeutics in March/April 2007.

The study was done on the consumption of Nutrim’s Oat Bran formula in 38 overweight men, half of whom consumed Nutrim while the other half consumed whole wheat bread—the only difference in their diets, which was the American Heart Association’s Step II diet. They all added sixty minutes of walking per day during the study. At the end of the study, the results showed the men who consumed Nutrim had a greater improvement to their lipid levels and weight than those who ate the wheat bread. [13]

Potential side effects are minimal unless you have an oat allergy. Nutrim does suggest going slow you if you haven’t had a lot of fiber in your diet before. They state:

People who typically consume low amounts of dietary fiber on a daily basis may go through an adjustment period as they adapt to the higher fiber levels. This may include increased gas and bloating. [14]

Word On The Street About Nutrim

Nearly 80 percent of the 37 customer reviews of Nutrim on Amazon.com were 4-star or better.

“M(heart)D” said, “My cholesterol was slightly high for two months in a row. While ordering something else I saw the ad for Nutrim. I ordered it and started Nutrim on 05/16/16. I had my labs ran again as I do monthly for my meds on 06/17/16 and the test came back normal for my cholesterol.” [4]

“Kerstin Magnusson” said, “I had a bit higher cholesterol values, than accepted. I was asked to take, Lipitor, (a statin), which I refused. instead I chose NUTRIM. I followed the directions and by my next blood work, four weeks later, I had managed to lower the cholesterol, by almost the normal count. … I recommend NUTRIM.” [4]

There were a few who said Nutrim did nothing for them; in a couple of cases cholesterol levels went up instead. Always work with your doctor to see if the problem is with a supplement itself or some other part of your health or lifestyle.

The Nutrim site itself has equally glowing reviews—which is to be expected, of course, but these were detailed enough to warrant sharing a couple:

“Judy P May,” 2011: “My Total Cholesterol went from 222 to 197, and my LDL went from 114 to 87, my triglycerides went from 56 to 66 but they are still in normal range. I mix the Nutrim with my yogurt and scrambled eggs. I also have been eating grapefruit, drinking almond milk and have been exercising. My heart raced when I was on the statin drugs and I don’t want to take them anymore.” [15]

“Joni T. Sacramento, California”, customer since 2008: In Only 90 Days I Lowered My Cholesterol 45 Points, Without Side Effects, Using Nutrim. “I got the best news today. Three months ago, I started using Nutrim to lower my cholesterol, today I learned that my cholesterol had dropped from 293 to 248. My bad cholesterol dropped also but is still too high. I will keep using Nutrim twice a day until it drops below 200. After that, I will use it once a day. I refuse to take the dangerous drugs my doctor wanted me to take. I am so thankful for the Oathealth Company for making it so easy to reduce my cholesterol, and without side effects.” [15]

Every supplement affects every individual differently. Gender, age, sometimes race, pre-existing medical conditions, and individual body chemistry—as unique as a fingerprint—can affect how a supplement works on you. That’s why supplements always add that “individual results may vary” disclaimer, and it’s why reviews for a drug or supplement can be all over the spectrum. Only you and your doctor can figure out how it works for you, so always be forthcoming and transparent with your doctor about side effects you experience, as well as if the substance doesn’t seem to be doing anything for you.

The Bottom Line. Is Nutrim Worth a Try?

Worth a try! Oats have been well-proven to aid in cholesterol and heart health, and Nutrim offers a mix easily dissolved in either food or water with no aftertaste or grit. The website does a great job of educating potential customers about the effects and benefits of taking Nutrim each day. One or two scoops a day makes it a user-friendly regimen, and $25 for a month’s supply really isn’t bad at all. Of all the supplements out there, this one gets a top spot on our list.

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Information on this website is not to replace the advise of the doctor, but rather for general education purposes. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease and should not be considered as medical advice. Aways consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any dietary supplements.

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