RoxyLean Review

RoxyLean is a thermogenic fat burning supplement said to help curb appetite, speed up metabolism, increases energy, and rev up overall loss of fat. It is sold on its manufacturer’s website, as well as on Amazon, GNC, VitaminShoppe, and Bodybuilding.com websites. A 60-capsule bottle (60-day supply) costs between $17 and $26, depending on where you buy it. 

The recommended dosage is no more than one capsule per day, because of the high caffeine content in each product—equivalent to three cups of coffee. It’s also not recommended to stack this supplement, for the same reason. [1] 

RoxyLean is produced by BPI Sports, headquartered in Hollywood, Florida. They have a Better Business Bureau file, opened in 2012, but they have no rating—” BBB does not have sufficient information to issue a rating for this business.”—no reviews, and no complaints. Company Contact Information: BPI Sports, 3149 SW 42nd Street, Hollywood, FL 33312. Phone: (954) 926-0900. [2] 

RoxyLean Claims 

BPI Sports brought back the extremely powerful fat burner and weight loss supplement, RoxyLean™. This highly-concentrated thermogenic will have you shedding pounds in no time. [1] 

This intense, highly-concentrated, fat burner features a synergistic and powerful mix of ingredients to increase your metabolic rate, for better results. Besides shredding fat by increasing thermogenesis, this weight loss formula also helps curb your appetite between meals for better appetite control. No need to worry about “the crash” or “jitters,” RoxyLean™ is designed to provide sustained energy release, turning your body into a fat blasting machine. This fat-burning supplement helps enhance mood, increase focus and mental clarity, for better workouts and productivity throughout your day. [1] 

RoxyLean also balances their claims with some reality check: 

Can I take RoxyLean™ with a pre-workout? It is not recommended to stack this thermogenic, since RoxyLean™ already has enough caffeine to give you the nonstop energy you need for intense workouts, without any of the jitters. 

Can I take RoxyLean™ more than once a day? No, it’s not recommended to take this extreme fat burner more than once a day since the caffeine amount is equal to about three cups of coffee. Multiple doses [of] RoxyLean™ can result in sleeplessness, nervousness and rapid heartbeat. 

How do I boost the power of RoxyLean™? It’s important to drink a lot of water throughout the day when taking a thermogenic and stay hydrated, since you’ll sweat more due to the higher metabolic rate. For maximum effectiveness, try to drink an entire glass of water when taking the capsule. [1] 

Their return policy is as such:  

Our return policy only applies to products purchased directly from our website. Your item must be in its original unused or unopened condition to be returned, unless there is a manufacturer defect. Your must return the item within 30 days of your purchase. Items cannot be returned if they are opened. [1]  

RoxyLean Ingredients [3] 

Thiamin (Vitamin B1, as thiamin HCl and thiamin disulfide), 185 mg (over twelve thousand times the Daily Value) 

Niacin (as nicotinic acid), 30 mg 

ROXYLEAN Blend (Proprietary), 510 mg:  

  • Caffeine (as caffeine anhydrous) 
  • Lemon (Citrus limon) (whole) 
  • Adhatoda (Adhatoda vasica) extract (leaf) 
  • Yohimbine (Pausinystalia yohimbe) extract (bark) 
  • Goldenseal (Hydrastis Canadensis) (root) 
  • White Willow (Salix alba) extract (root) (providing Salicin) 
  • Chinese skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) (root) 
  • Rauwolfia (Raywolfia serpentina) (root/rhizome) 

The Science (or Lack Thereof) Behind RoxyLean 

RoxyLean cites no scientific backing for its formula, but we can look at the individual ingredients. 

Let’s check Thiamin first, since it’s overwhelmingly the largest part of RoxyLean. The Mayo Clinic says Thiamine is “likely safe when taken by mouth daily in amounts considered to be RDA,” and when treating specific conditions thiamine is “possibly safe: 50-100 milligrams taken by mouth daily for 3-6 months; 50-100 milligrams injected into the vein 3-4 times daily; and 5-200 milligrams injected into the muscle in five divided doses over two days.” [4]  

However, they do also list some warnings: 

Thiamine may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people who have low blood pressure or those taking drugs that lower blood pressure. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or high blood sugar, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar or that widen blood vessels. Use cautiously in breastfeeding women, people who have abnormal heart rates, and those receiving chemotherapy. … Avoid using in the absence of vitamin B6 and nicotinamide, as life-threatening brain damage may occur. 

Thiamine may cause drowsiness, excitation, immune changes, increased cancer risk, muscle relaxation, seizures (when injected into the vein or brain), skin irritation (burning or itching), slow heart rate, weight changes, and widened blood vessels. [4] 

Chinese skullcap has been studied and so far has shown promise for soothing anxiety, soothing the nervous system, as well as aiding in weight loss. According to Organic Facts 

Although the research on this particular aspect of skullcap is still rather unclear, it appears that the reduction of triglycerides stimulated by it can also help for rapid weight loss when combined with a proper diet. This research is ongoing, but presents an exciting new option for those looking for new ways to lose weight. [5] 

White Willow extract has been used for many years to help fight inflammation, which in turn has been used to help back pain and osteoarthritis. In fact, white willow was the precursor and foundation for our modern-day aspirin. As such, it’s also a blood thinner, so be aware if you have an abnormal bleeding condition or are taking an anti-coagulant (like warfarin). Obesity has been linked to inflammation, so I assume that’s the logic behind including white willow in this supplement. 

According to a study published in the 2015 Phytotherapy Research 

A small number of clinical studies have been conducted that support the use of willow bark extracts in chronic lower back and joint pain and osteoarthritis. Willow bark extracts also are widely used in sports performance and weight loss products presumably because of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, although no human studies have been published that specifically and directly document beneficial effects[6] (emphasis added) 

Yohimbine shows up in a lot of supplements. But there’s one big problem with it. From WebMD.com: 

Studies have shown that drugs containing the chemical yohimbine work for erectile dysfunction. Yohimbine drugs have also been used to ease the sexual side effects of antidepressants and to treat low sex drive in women. … Some people take it hoping that it will improve their athletic performance or help them lose weight. However, these uses have not been studied. Because yohimbe can have serious risks, don’t use it without a doctor’s supervision.  

Yohimbe bark might cause skin flushing, rash, agitation, anxiety, insomnia, dizziness, rapid heartbeat, increased urination, headache, nausea, and vomiting…. More serious side effects can include chest pain, heart attack, heart rhythm problems such as atrial fibrillation, kidney failure and seizures. … If you have any medical conditions— like anxiety disorders, depression, other psychiatric conditions, heart problems, prostate problems, high or low blood pressure, kidney or liver disease, or Alzheimer’s disease—DO NOT take yohimbe supplements without talking to a doctor first. [7] (emphasis added) 

I don’t know why Niacin is in this ingredient list. Aside from some mention that it might help improve joint flexibility, the only even remotely weight-related information I could find was back at the Mayo Clinic website, along with some warnings: 

Human research has shown that niacin is effective and relatively safe for treating high cholesterol levels. Limited evidence shows that niacin may help with clogged arteries and heart disease. Side effects commonly related to higher doses of niacin are itching, flushing, and stomach upset. Niacin may also cause liver problems, increased blood sugar, and hormone changes. [8] 

The only RoxyLean ingredient that has been proven to work for increased energy is caffeine, and people take different forms of caffeine for this reason, whether in coffee, energy drinks, or diet pills.  

Word On The Street About RoxyLean 

RoxyLean scored just 3 out of 5 stars on Amazon.com, my go-to for honest reviews. The main overall theme was the side effects people were experiencing, matching almost exactly the niacin and yohimbine side effects we saw in the science section. Rashes and headaches were common.  

A 5-star review was marred by an allergic reaction: “n.miller” (2017) said, 

It helped me lose weight but it gave me horrible rash all over my body. If you can tolerate niacin, this is a great product for you. It will make you sweat and you will see results in short period of time. I unfortunately can not tolerate niacin well, and I had to stop using it. Good luck. [9] 

A 3-star reviewer had a similar story. “JS Coleman” (2017): 

It works really well & definitely curbs your appetite, however it made me break out in a red rash on my face, chest & hands [10] 

And “CLW” (2017, 2 stars) said it was just too intense for him.  

I will start this with saying, everyone is different. I personally did not like this product. And even after I decided I was going to stop taking it, I tried for two more days to see if the side effects went away. But, I’m afraid they did not. As far as side effects, the niacin caused my entire body to turn red and my skin itched. The amount of caffeine in this product was too high for my tolerance, making it very hard to focus on one thing. [11] 

The Bottom Line: Is RoxyLean Worth A Try? 

Risky. I wouldn’t. Even though folks said they lost weight with it, the niacin scares and the yohimbine warnings really lead me to recommend giving RoxyLean a wide berth. Especially when there doesn’t seem to be a scientific reason for the niacin to be there in the first place. Better to take the safe lane and avoid this one.

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