Schmilk Review

Schmilk is a nutritional drink that is created by the small start up company, Super Body Fuel, located in the Bay Area. The two founders of Super Body Fuel are Alex Cho Snyder and Richard Sim. They are a small food manufacturing company located in San Francisco and work out of the industrial Dogpatch neighborhood. The powdered meals that this company produces tastes similar to milk, and they are a complete meal replacement powder. The drink caters to ketogenic and high protein diets. The powder is vegan, hypoallergenic, and free of artificial sweeteners and sugar. [1] Schmilk simply needs to be mixed with milk in order to make a complete meal. The caloric content of the drink varies depending on how much milk you add, as it starts at 1,200 calories and can go all of the way up to 2,000.  

Company Contact Information: 

Super Body Fuel 

2565 3rd St, Suite 316 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Schmilk Claims 

The company keeps it really simple and they do not make any huge claims about their product. They mention it tastes like cereal milk and can provide you optimal nutrition and act as a meal replacement. For a small package of Schmilk that provides 20 meals, you will pay $30.00 plus shipping fees. There are a few flavors you can choose from: Unsweetened (natural), Chocolate, Cinnamon, and Original. The other size option is called “Big” and it costs $60.00 for 40 meals. They claim that it is best cold, and that you should let the shakes sit in the fridge for a small amount of time before you drink them.  

When looking into their refund policy, it was nowhere to be found on the site. The powder itself lasts for one year on the shelf opened, and once you mix it with water or milk, it is good to last a few days in the fridge. If you do not put it in the fridge, it will only last a few hours, and then you’ll need to throw it out. The other purchasing option that Schmilk makes available to the customer is a subscription either monthly or bimonthly where you will pay either $25.00 per month/bimonthly for the small package of 20 meals, or $50.00 for 40 meals.  

Schmilk Ingredients 

The breakdown of the different amounts and calories: 

  • For 1,400 calories (whole milk) 1 cup, or for 2,000 calories (whole milk) 2 cups. 
  • For 1,350 calories (2% milk) 1 cup, or for 1,900 calories (2% milk) 2 cups. 
  • For 1,200 calories (soy milk) 1 cup, or for 1,600 calories (soy milk) 2 cups. 
  • For 1,200 calories (almond milk) 1 cup, or for 1,600 calories (almond milk) 2 cups. 

Schmilk Plain 

Gluten Free Oat Flour, Acacia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Sea salt, Potassium Bicarbonate, Magnesium Malate, Choline L-Bitartrate, Ascorbic Acid,  DL-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Glycinate, Ferrous Gluconate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, D-Biotin, Ergocalciferol, Selenium Glycinate, Beta Carotene, Niacinamide, Copper Glycinate, Phytonadione, Retinyl Palmitate, Boron Glycinate, Menaquinone-7, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Molybdenum Glycinate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Chromium Picolinate, Cyanocobalamin, Folic Acid, L-Methylfolate, Calcium, Methylcobalamin. [2] 

Schmilk Original

Gluten Free Oat Flour, Acacia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Sea salt, Potassium Bicarbonate, Magnesium Malate, Choline L-Bitartrate, Ascorbic Acid,  DL-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Glycinate, Ferrous Gluconate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, D-Biotin, Ergocalciferol, Selenium Glycinate, Beta Carotene, Niacinamide, Copper Glycinate, Phytonadione, Retinyl Palmitate, Boron Glycinate, Menaquinone-7, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Molybdenum Glycinate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Chromium Picolinate, Cyanocobalamin, Folic Acid, L-Methylfolate, Calcium, Methylcobalamin. Flavoring: Monk fruit Extract. [2] 

Schmilk Cinnamon 

Gluten Free Oat Flour, Acacia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Sea salt, Potassium Bicarbonate, Magnesium Malate, Choline L-Bitartrate, Ascorbic Acid,  DL-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Glycinate, Ferrous Gluconate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, D-Biotin, Ergocalciferol, Selenium Glycinate, Beta Carotene, Niacinamide, Copper Glycinate, Phytonadione, Retinyl Palmitate, Boron Glycinate, Menaquinone-7, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Molybdenum Glycinate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Chromium Picolinate, Cyanocobalamin, Folic Acid, L-Methylfolate, Calcium, Methylcobalamin. [2] 

Schmilk Chocolate

Organic Dutched Cocoa, Monk Fruit Extract, Gluten Free Oat Flour, Acacia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Sea salt, Potassium Bicarbonate, Magnesium Malate, Choline L-Bitartrate, Ascorbic Acid,  DL-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Glycinate, Ferrous Gluconate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, D-Biotin, Ergocalciferol, Selenium Glycinate, Beta Carotene, Niacinamide, Copper Glycinate, Phytonadione, Retinyl Palmitate, Boron Glycinate, Menaquinone-7, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Molybdenum Glycinate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Chromium Picolinate, Cyanocobalamin, Folic Acid, L-Methylfolate, Calcium, Methylcobalamin. Flavoring: Monk fruit Extract. [2] 

The Science (or Lack Thereof) Behind Schmilk 

The Schmilk mix milk drink is best known to be a meal replacement, but there are no real studies done on their formula. Because the product is so new, it is rather untested in the grand scheme of things. The website is very basic regarding their products, let alone how they actually came up with the formula itself. Unlike some powdered meal replacement companies that push a total food revolt, this company simply says you can replace your meals entirely or just use them once a day.

According to the Los Angeles Times,  

“Cho Snyder was among the first to “hack” the Soylent recipe, making modifications to it by reducing the amount of carbs and upping the fiber. He conducted his food science experiments in his kitchen, whipping up batches of homemade Soylent for himself and posting his modified recipes online.” [3] 

When the creator was asked about the vitamin and mineral content of this drink and it possibly being too much, he explained it in an interesting way. He said that the daily recommended value for vitamin D is much too low in general, and that is why they intentionally upped the percentage in the powder. The same goes for vitamin B, because many people as they age are not able to absorb the vitamins as well, so there was a reason for the uptick here too.

The largest concern overall was too much calcium, and the owners comments were: 

“Calcium is probably the biggest legitimate concern here. All of the calcium comes from milk, and if you are consuming a half gallon of milk per day (via Schmilk, or otherwise) you will be just under the recommended upper limit for calcium intake. That upper limit does come with a decent margin of safety, so it shouldn't be a problem, but it's definitely the biggest real concern, in my understanding. If you are concerned about calcium intake, either use half as much milk for the lower-calorie option, or limit your Schmilk (and milk) intake to two meals a day.” [4] 

Word On The Street About Schmilk

Richard (2016, 3 star),  

“I liked Schmilk, but only when prepared in a blender. Hand-stirring the stuff made something like milk with clay floating in it. It's just not soluble. Still! It's very appetizing in a blender!” [5] 

Mike (2017, 2 star),  

“I hate the name Schmilk. To the point that I don't even want to tell people that's technically the name of the stuff I'm drinking. Generally I mention Soylent before I say the brand I'm drinking is Schmilk. It's very odd. This may be an unfair comparison, but I like Schmilk so much better than Soylent. Unfair because I had Soylent original 2.0, and Schmilk I've had both chocolate and cinnamon. I have. Original, but haven't had it yet. Cinnamon is by far my favorite. Taste and texture remind me of some blended up cinnamon toast crunch with milk.” [6] 

Eradik (2017, 4 star),  

“Schmilk is absolutely delicious. I love the chocolate flavor and it tastes absolutely amazing. However in order to get the texture under control you must use a blender. I had way too many lumps when shaking in a shaker bottle for my liking. 

I also noticed the protein was a little lacking. I was hungry an hour after drinking a meal. I started adding protein powder and that fixed that problem. However when you calculate in cost of the Schmilk, protein powder, and the milk it started to get expensive (and price was one of the best things about Schmilk).” [7] 

The Bottom Line: Is Schmilk Worth A Try? 

Yes. When looking at the nuts and bolts of this Schmilk meal, it has many nutrients and is originally created. What I mean by this is the formula took a lot of time, testing, and thought from the creators, and they are always changing it. In 2016, Schmilk came onto the scene, and if you are into mixing milk, this product just might be for you. While it might not be the best to drink these shakes at every meal due to the higher calorie content, they are best replaced once or twice per day. Because the product is so new, there are very few studies on its effectiveness, but the customers who have tried it seemed to have enjoyed the taste of it. This simple milk meal is also a little low in protein, so if you are needing a boost in protein, keep in mind you might have to add even more calories to your shake.  

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