The G.I. Diet Review

The G.I. Diet book was written by Rick Gallop and Michael J. Sole back in January of 2010 and was voted New York Best Seller as well as Wall Street Journal Best Seller. These awards were won many years ago, so does the diet keep up with the new age movement of dieting? First of all, G.I. stands for “Glycemic Index” and the hope is that the dieter will lose weight permanently while paying attention to the glycemic index of foods they are eating. The authors tried to make the diet as simple as possible by creating a green, yellow, and red light approach within the foods groups. They state on the front cover of the book, “If you understand a traffic light, you will understand this diet.”* The green foods are going to be the centerpiece foods of your diet, the yellow are occasional food items, and the red are foods to avoid that cause a spike to your insulin levels such as white breads and starches.

The book offers an official website, but they do not offer any means of support for the reader. It is a simple website that offers a little note from the author and then points people to purchase on Amazon.com. Included in the book will be recipes, snack ideas, shopping lists, and tips for eating out.

insulin levelDo Dieters Lose Weight On The G.I. Diet?

The book reviewers are a mix and match of people who were satisfied with the book and its information, along with folks who really did not like the format and were not losing weight when following it. Many people reported that they just wanted a blatant list of foods they could eat, should proceed with caution, and avoid like it markets but they were given a lot of advice instead. A lot of the advice leaned more toward a “low fat” diet which we now know is rather bad for your body due to the high hidden sugars in many low fat items. There were luckily no terrible side effects reported when following the diet, but there were quite a few people say they just simply did not lose any weight.

I love the labels of green, yellow, and red, so easy to read…it is very easy to follow. I don't need to lose weight, but, I do like to follow the low G.I. diet, and this book makes it easy for me to get the basic concept. I am not a fan of using artificial sweeteners and processed foods though…” W Chang*

 Light Child* said, “The relationship between the glycemic index values of food and insulin resistance are quite clear to me from research I've done and my personal struggles trying for more than a year to lose what I call “the last 10 pounds.” I was excited to find this book and ordered it for my Kindle after reading the sample offered by Amazon. But I found many contradictions to good health and to the GI that Gallop recommends and even lists specifically, such as dried apricots as something to have in one's “kitchen cupboard essentials,” when in fact any dried fruit has a very high GI.” They then went onto say that certain foods the author is promoting are not that healthy after all, like Kashi Go Lean which is loaded with 13 grams of processed sugar. Whole wheat bread was also in the mix, and that also contains sugar, so the information really did not make sense to the reader and they wanted to return (but couldn't). They say you could lose weight on this diet but it is no different than others on the market saying the same exact thing. Health and longevity according to this reader is more about a healthy weight, and healthy foods for longterm health not quick pounds lost. Overall they were very disappointed.

Susan* said, “I really wanted a book that would give me detailed information on the glycemic index of specific foods. I don't need help or advice on whether or not I should eat bacon or egg yolks or butter. I have my own (research- and experience-based) opinions on those. She then went onto say that this particular book is for people who do not want to think about what they are eating and just blindly follow instructions. If you are anywhere near informed about nutrition she does not recommend you read this book, as you will only leave disappointed.

 Is The G.I. Diet Easy To Follow?

The book has been said to be an easy read for the most part, and the authors made a point to incorporate the colors to make the foods as straight forward as possible. A lot of the information the authors are spitting at the reader have been noticed to be a little outdated (which comes naturally with an older book), but it may not be as relevant to today’s day and age with how many advances we have made in the dieting world since. A specialist in nutrition commented on this book and its scientific information and overall foundation of the book and said: “As a specialist in this field, I can say that the recommendations in this book not only contain multiple errors but also are unsound and, in many cases, will cause additional medical problems. Low GI is definitely the healthiest kind of a diet to follow, but healthy fats and proteins are also important, as is avoiding the many sources of “poisons” in our food. This book, unfortunately, does more harm than good.” Mark R.*

 old bookConclusion

There was definitely no ill intent when writing this book, and the authors did their best within the years of writing it, but it has been proven to be outdated. Sweeteners such as Aspartame are poison for the body and has been linked to brain cancer, the poor talk of eggs yolks are just foolish in today’s knowledge on the health and wellness.* The authors provide the customer an official website to look at but they provide no channels or support or social media sites to keep up with the day and age. This book will slowly dwindle away over the years due to its very seasonal informational on how to diet, lose weight, and become healthier overall.

*Please keep in mind that with any diet or weight loss program, individual results will vary.

Review Sources

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*Individual results will vary.