True Grade Garcinia Review

Of all the supplements out there claiming to help you lose weight, there doesn’t seem to be one as besieged by scams as Garcinia Cambogia. This feels like the twentieth review I’ve done on a G. cambogia product with the same less-than-above-board marketing. 

True Grade Garcinia markets itself as a 60% HCA (Hydroxycitric Acid) supplement, said to suppress your appetite and reduce food cravings.  

There’s some mystery, not only as to who makes this brand, but also who actually is marketing it or even what brand it actually is. The initial sales page lists a 2017 copyright of “True Grade Garcinia;” but then when you click on the “Rush my Free Trial” button you get taken to a page for “Slim LT Garcinia” and the copyright at the bottom is “Nutra Support.” The company listed as the legal entity in the Terms and Conditions is “Nutra Garcinia,” and there is no mailing address listed under the terms and conditions. You have to email them for an address. The Customer Service number goes to a Truecaller.com ID search result named “Garcia” (You’d think they could at least spell “Garcinia”). So warning bells all over the place. 

And then what they don’t tell you after screaming about a “free trial! Pay only shipping”—because it’s buried deep in the Terms and Conditions… 

A trial offer provides the customer an opportunity to try our product free of charge for 14 days from date of order, paying only shipping and handling fees of $4.95(USD). At the conclusion of the trial period, you will be billed the full purchase price of $86.94(USD) and enrolled in the monthly replenishment program. [1] (emphasis added) 

This little scam is called “negative-option marketing,” and according to the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) it is supposed to be clearly stated up front so the customer is aware of what they’re getting into. But funny thing about all these G. Cambogia supplements that they all lead back to “Nutra-something”—they don’t state it clearly at all. [2] 

True Grade Garcinia Claims 

True Grade Garcinia Cambogia is the most all natural and most amazing weight loss diet you have ever seen. For many people losing weight consist of working out at the gym, exercising or even watching what they eat, but these diet won’t always work because every person loses weight differently, however with our astonishing supplement you will actually be able to lose even more weight. We created this formula with 100% all natural ingredients to help boost the energy in your body, help you reduce weight, increase your metabolism and much more in just a few weeks’ time. … 

More and more people are trying to lose weight, but don’t always have the know how on what they need to do to lose weight. We are happy to bring you the best possible and most natural diet supplement that can help your body even if sitting on the couch. [3]  

Uh, no. Most of us know exactly what we have to do to lose weight; get up off the couch, trade in the vast majority of our junk food, and start eating healthier and exercising. It’s just that a lot of us don’t want to do it. Two little pills of anything is not going to make up for a sedentary lifestyle filled with processed, sugary, fat-laden foods.  

Now, that doesn’t necessarily mean G. cambogia is useless. But, as we’ll look at in the science, it’s far, far from a miracle pill that melts the fat off your body while you sit binge-watching Netflix with a tub of cheese balls and a box of donuts. 

True Grade Garcinia cites no science to back up its Fountain-of-Youth-worthy claims. There’s not even a Supplement Facts label available anywhere on the sales page—or on an extensive Web search—so you don’t know if the G. cambogia is mixed with anything else (even many above-board brands combine it with other ingredients).  

True Grade Garcinia Ingredients 

There is no Supplement Facts information available anywhere, so aside from the “60% HCA” on the front label, there is no other information as to what is in True Grade Garcinia. Nor does it say how much of this 60 percent HCA is in each pill.  

The Science (or Lack Thereof) Behind True Grade Garcinia 

This brand and its questionable marketing aside, G. cambogia has been studied in multiple different clinical studies, and the results overwhelmingly come out the same. It’s not a miracle pill, it’s not a fat burner, and it doesn’t seem to be effective past the 12-week mark. But it is a mild-to-moderate appetite suppressant due to its ability to stimulate or increase production of serotonin, and it may be a fat inhibitor—not useful for weight loss, but possibly useful for preventing further weight gain.   

According to one study, cited in a meta-study (summary conclusion of all the to-date available studies) published in the 2011 Journal of Obesity, there was a group of controlled participants who fell within the obese category. Some simply followed clean diets while others were given HCA in addition to the clean diet, and the results were not impressive.  

The evidence from RCTs suggests that Garcinia extracts/HCA generate weight loss on the short term. However, the magnitude of this effect is small, is no longer statistically significant when only rigorous [randomized clinical trials] RCTs are considered, and its clinical relevance seems questionable. [4] 

While many of the studies reported appetite suppression, they didn’t show large amounts of weight loss with any of the participants, especially longer than a 12-week period.  

Two studies reported a significant reduction in appetite in the HCA group, but not with placebo. Three other studies did not find any significant difference between HCA and placebo groups in terms of satiety effect. [4] 

What the studies compiling this meta-review also found is a short-term effect for appetite suppression and some help with weight loss—though more as  result of appetite suppression and not so much as a fat burner in its own right. 

It might be called a fat inhibitor, though. In several studies HCA has been shown to inhibit an enzyme—ATP citrate lyase—whose primary purpose is to convert carbohydrates into fat. If I understand the science correctly, this is the result: by inhibiting this enzyme, the carbs apparently stay carbs and get burned before any stored fat gets burned (the body always burns carbs first). So while that does nothing for weight loss—you still have to reach the point where the body has no carbs left to burn before it starts burning fat—it might help in preventing further weight gain[5] 

But even this conclusion has a few issues left to resolve.  

None of [the studies reviewed] have shown whether these effects persist beyond 12 weeks of intervention. Therefore, there is still little evidence to support the potential effectiveness and long-term benefits of G. Cambogia extracts. [5] (emphasis added) 

G. cambogia did come under fire in 2009 when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) identified the consumption ofan HCA-containing supplement as a possible cause of liver damage. But several studies have indicated that HCA itself—and thus G. cambogia—may not be the culprit.  

Dr. Sidney J. Stohs,  Pharmacy PhD from the University of Nebraska, and colleagues reported that while some cases of toxicity and specifically liver damage had been associated to the consumption of these products, it was premature to blame HCA for that damage; mainly because some of the branded products tested did not contain HCA, but did contain up to 20 other ingredients. So while HCA might be involved, there was no conclusive evidence of such. [6] [7] [8] 

Other studies, by Dr. Stohs and others, suggest that a moderate dosage of G. cambogia (HCA) by itself—with no other added ingredients—is safe, barring other pre-existing health problems: the maximum daily safe dosage was determined as 2800 mg/day (I assume 60% concentration, the most common concentration used in supplements, but the abstract didn’t specify). Of course, research is ongoing. [8] [9] [10]   

The most common side effects associated with taking HCA supplements are but not limited to: Nausea, Digestive Tract Discomfort, and Headaches. [11] 

The Word On The Street About True Grade Garcinia 

There are no outside reviews done of the effectiveness of this brand, and there are hardly any places to purchase this product outside of the free trial offer site. With little to no information about whether this particular brand works, it raises several red flags.  

In 2014, the US Federal Trade Commission’s Consumer Information website featured an article about the risk of signing up for a “free” product trial order.  

The reality: the company can’t support — or deliver on — those weight loss claims. If you give your credit or debit account number, you get charged $60 to $210 every month — and it’s almost impossible to get a refund. On top of that, you get enrolled in offers you didn’t ask for — with more monthly charges.” [12]  

With the information readily available to the customer on why they should avoid these particular offers and products, it should come as no surprise that True Grade Garcinia falls directly into this category.  

The Bottom Line: Is True Grade Garcinia Worth A Try? 

Definitely, definitely NOT. You can walk into any grocery or big-box chain store, or go to any number of reputable online retailers, and get a G. cambogia supplement for under $20. A lot less money to see if it does anything for you.  

True Grade is a scam, one of many proliferated by the same parent company or cluster of companies. A trial offer that automatically signs you up for an extortionate autoship program, nonexistent customer service so you have to practically pull hen’s teeth to get a refund or a stop to the autoship, and a runaround of company information make this a run in the other direction product. 

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