Wheat Belly Diet Review

Wheat Belly was written in 2011 by William Davis, MD whose primary goal is to help dieters get off of wheat. Davis contends that it is the high consumption of wheat in the average person’s diet that is responsible for their excess weight, especially in their belly area. By eliminating the wheat, he says most dieters can also eliminate their bellies. Wheat is found in much of the countries processed foods and almost everywhere you look in grocery stores today. Eliminating wheat is not an easy feat, but it sets the dieter up for a reality check regarding their everyday foods.

Wheat contains 75% amylopectin and 25% amylsoe, which can have a negative effect on insulin response.* This in turn prompts the body to store the wheat as fat, and it is more often than not stored in the belly. Also, wheat contains gluten, which can be linked to a number of ailments and diseases including Irritable Bowel Syndrome and even gastrointestinal cancer. According to Davis, a large amount of weight can be shed within the first few months of being totally wheat free.*

Do Dieters Lose Weight On The Wheat Belly Diet?

The Wheat Belly diet book calls for a very specific way of eating. Basically, dieters are all but eliminating carbohydrates. Because many of the eliminated foods are ones that are higher in calories, that means some weight loss is almost sure to occur. However, this weight loss will only continue as long as the dieter continues to eat in this very specific way. Any slip up could cause the gaining back of some, or all of the weight already lost. The book contains alternatives to the banned foods so that you do not starve when you are looking to supplement more whole foods into your diet. Foods on a low glycemic index are foods that you should be eating such as nuts, fruits, healthy fats like avocados and yogurts without the added sugar, as well as high quality meats and veggies.

There were many reviews done by real customers, take a look below:

PR* said, “The good: The book is an interesting read for the first half or so. For me, the information was new and insightful. Of course we know that genetically modified food exists and is being consumed, but have these really been tested on humans? Apparently not.” She goes onto say that she feels the effects of the diet coming over her and they are pleasant. She no longer gets 2:00pm mid day crashes and does not indulge in muffins that make you even hungrier than when you consumed them. Many of the food companies now days only care about making money, even if that means making innocent people fat and sick in the process. It all has to do with the mutant alien dwarf grains, and it is rather sad.
“The downside: While the author does a fantastic job of setting up his ideas…he closes terribly. The “now what” sections are not linear and poorly correlated and summarized. The recipe section should be removed and properly vetted. I've tried three recipes and all were sub par or simply gross (Tofu Chocolate Mousse was horrible). This is a significant waste of money for experimentation purposes as the alternate ingredients are sometimes quite costly (i.e. almond flour ain't cheap).” 

Nicole J. Barrett* said, “I liked reading about the evolution of wheat and how modified it is nowadays. I have a friend who lost 60 pounds from excluding wheat from her diet. I tried the diet too but lost nothing. Then I took a food allergy test that showed that I wasn't even mildly allergic to wheat but was sensitive to whey and eggs. Dr. Davis suggests eating as much cheese and eggs as you want without even warning you that you could be allergic to these things.” Nicole went onto say that she felt like the author was convinced that everyone and their dog had a wheat allergy, when that is not so much the case. It is still good however to get educated about food and health even though she felt like it related to her personally regarding allergies.

Is The Wheat Belly Diet Easy To Follow?

The Wheat Belly book does a great job of explaining why wheat may need to be eliminated from a diet, but that doesn’t mean it will be easy to do. Many favorite foods contain wheat. Foods like pastas, muffins, and breads all contain wheat. By completely eliminating these foods, dieters will have cravings in a big way, especially at first. This can be amplified if a dieter is eating out as there are little options that are totally wheat free. There is also no guidance on fitness with Wheat Belly. So, the book only covers half the weight loss battle and leaves the dieter to figure out exercising on their own. Many times the dieter is going to experience serious withdrawal symptoms like headaches, fatigue, irritability, and nausea.

Conclusion

The Wheat Belly diet book retails for $15 and the information provided can prove to be helpful. However, the book is lacking in overall guidance. While it may be great for someone who has a wheat allergy, it is not going to be the solution for someone who is looking for a program that offers complete direction in the areas of both nutrition and fitness. As stated by the customers above, it has seen to be educational but not work for everyone who picks up a copy. Do you research, and understand that there is more cost that comes along with this book when you take into consideration food costs as well as your time spent incorporating these habits into your everyday life.

*Please keep in mind that with any diet or weight loss program, individual results will vary.

Review Sources
  1. “Wheat Belly.” Amazon Books. Web

Top 5 Diets in 2018*

Program Price
Food Recipes
Health Coaches
Phone support
Email Support
Support Group
6 Month MBG
#1 PS1000 Plan
$$
#2 Trim Down Club
$
#3 Ketogenic Diet
$$$
#4 Weight Watchers
$$$$
#5 Medifast
$$$$

*Individual results will vary.

Information on this website is not to replace the advise of the doctor, but rather for general education purposes. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease and should not be considered as medical advice. Aways consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any dietary supplements.

Articles, reviews and investigations are our own opinion, and written based on the information publicly available or simply contacting the companies. We try our best to stay up to date with constantly changing information. If you find any information inaccurate, please email us, we’ll verify for accuracy and update it.

Disclosure: some of the links on this website are affiliate links. This means that if you purchase an item following one of the links, we will receive a commission. Regardless of that, we only recommend the products or services, that we strongly believe will benefit our readers. Read full disclosure here.”